Asian hotels

Australian hotels

New Zealand hotels

Pacific Island hotels

Micronesia

Melanesia

Polynesia

Hawaii

Central America

Central America hotels

South America hotels

Europe and Middle East hotels

General travel info

Kuala Lumpur Hotels

Kuala Lumpur Crash Course

Kuala Lumpur at sunrise
Kuala Lumpur at sunrise

Kuala Lumpur (or KL as it is commonly known), is the capital city of Malaysia. With over 243 square kilometres, KL has a variety of reasonably priced hotels, an excellent variety of cuisines, a blend of six major cultures and religions, Moorish, Tudor and modern architectural styles, a great efficient infrastructure, and prices lower than most major Asian cities.

The monorail above the street
The monorail above the street

Nowadays KL is not only the business and commercial capital of Malaysia it is also the political capital and the largest city in the country. With plans afoot to make it one of the most competitive Asian countries by the year 2020, Kuala Lumpur grows year by year, almost day by day and now massive skyscrapers grace the once wild horizon.


Despite all the recent developments the city retains much of its past splendour. Old colonial buildings stand proud, jostling sidewalk space with ultra modern high-rise establishments.

Street vendors and night markets are scattered around the heart of the city making it a vibrant and exciting place for the visitor. Different cultures compete to sell their produce and temples from various religions stand side by side, each with their own unique beauty and heritage.

The history of Kuala Lumpur

Meaning 'muddy confluence' in Malay, the city of Kuala Lumpur began as late as 1857 when a group of 87 Chinese miners, sent by Malay Chief of Klang to search for better sources of tin, a strong but light weight metal, in high demand in both America and Britain, fueled by the industrial revolution. They settled in the present suburb of Ampang, an area that dominated the malaria-infested converging valleys of two rivers, the Klang and Gombak. Factions formed within themselves to fight over mining claims of the valuable metal, and water rights, until 1868 when the headmen of the local groups elected Yap Ah Loy as leader of the entire Chinese community. He has often been recognized as the founding father of Kuala Lumpur.
Yap Ah Loy
Yap Ah Loy
Aerial view of tin mining lakes
Aerial view of tin mining lakes

As more and more miners moved in, lawless anarchy took over. Fighting between sultanates, the Malay Civil War broke out, and Kuala Lumpur was burned to the ground. Merchants, afraid of losing everything, requested Britain's intervention. The Brits were happy to oblige for their own continued economic prosperity not only with tin, but also the production of rubber. During the late 18th and 19th centuries, Great Britain established colonies and protectorates in the area of current Malaysia. Andrew Clark appraised the situation, and convinced the feuding princes to sign the 'Pangkor Agreement' in 1874, which significantly insisted that in any issues other than religion and custom, the British would be allowed the final decision. In 1886, a rail line connected KL to the Indian Ocean port of Kelang.

Sultan Abdul Samad Building
Sultan Abdul Samad Building

Sir Frank Swettenham, the British resident decision-maker from 1882 encouraged the use of cement bricks and tile for all future construction to prevent fires, and reduce diseases. He brought together the Sultans of four states under the new umbrella of the Federated Malay States (FMS), and Kuala Lumpur was picked as the capital for its central location. They governed from under the impressive copper domes of the Sultan Abdul Samad Building. However, KL became the classic colonial city, with its exclusive 'whites only' Selangor Club catering to the British whims for cricket and scotch, igniting the fires of independence.

Malaysia occupied during the Second World War by Japan from 1942 to 1945. In 1948, the British-ruled territories on the Malay Peninsula formed the Federation of Malaya, which became independent in 1957.

Royal Selangor Club
Royal Selangor Club

During a communist-lead guerrilla insurgency from 1948 to 60, the population of KL increased substantially expanding into the outskirts. In 1957, the British lowered the Union Jack and the raised of the new Malaysian flag at the Royal Selangor Club allowing KL to become the capital of the independent Federation of Malaya in 1957 and later, of Malaysia in 1963 when the former British colonies of Singapore and the East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak on the northern coast of Borneo joined the Federation. During these years Indonesian made efforts to control Malaysia, the Philippine claimed Sabah, and Singapore seceeded from the Malaysian Federation in 1965.

Civil unrest, sparked by racial tensions, created a state of emergency in 1969 that would last for two years. However, the tensions subsided with a growing economy and a deep desire for peace. Since the late 1990s, Kuala Lumpur has seen tremendous growth, starting with the (short lived claim to fame) world's tallest buildings, the Petronas Twin Towers, which were outdone in 2003 by the Taipei 101 Financial Center in Taiwan.

The geography of Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur is characterized by lush green valleys and picturesque Titiwangsa Mountains. It is forty
Titiwangsa Mountains
Titiwangsa Mountains
kilometers inland from the Straits of Malacca half way between Thailand to the north and Singapore to the south east. The nation-state resides in South-Eastern part of Asian sub-continent. The Titiwangsa Mountains, with numerous smaller ranges flank the eastern side of the city. From lofty places, looking south west, are panoramic views of the Straits of Malacca,
Straits of Malacca
Straits of Malacca
a strategic hub in international navigation connecting the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

In the center of the state of Selangor, KL's urban zone has a wealth of tin. reas outside of KL are supported by the production of rubber which you will see travelling through the region by train.

Climate

Being just a few hundred miles north of the equator, KL's equatorial climate is muggy and sultry and the annual rainfall which comes throughout the year is around 163 mm to 275 mm.
Kuala Lumpur's climate
Kuala Lumpur's climate
A small umbrella can come in handy. Heavy rains causing erosion are a major annual catastrophy as many hillsides have been stripped of their vegetation. KL generally has great air except when forest fires from nearby Sumatra cause a 'haze' to hang over the city.

KL's temperature does not go below of 19C, and is warm like the welcome you will receive.

KL's demographics

Population

Kuala Lumpur proper has an estimated population of just under two
Bumiputra rockers
Bumiputra rockers
million people, however, when combined with its surrounding suburban areas also within the Klang Valley such as Petaling Jaya, Subang Jaya, Shah Alam, Selayang, Ampang, Putrajaya and Cyberjaya, the greater Kuala Lumpur area has an estimated population of over seven million residents. A declining birth rate for Kuala Lumpur means a lower percentage of children and a higher percentage of working age people. The percentage of seniors over sixty years has also increased to about six percent of the population.

A Chinese originated population is the highest percentage of people found in Kuala Lumpur at around 42%, the indigenous Malay (Bumiputra) population is around 39%, and an Indian based group make up around 10%. Other foreigners make up the remaining 9% of the city’s population.

Education and language

Only 2.5% of the population is illiterate, with Malay the language of instruction in most subjects and English, a compulsory language, is used for the instruction in maths and sciences. According to government statistics, Kuala Lumpur has a literacy rate of 97.5% in 2000. Some private schools base their education in Mandarin and Tamil. There are several universities in Kuala Lumpur. Throughout Malaysia, the official language is Malay but in Kuala Lumpur, English is spoken widely especially in the business sector. The Chinese and Indians have also brought their individual dialects, spoken only among themselves.
Malay dance
Malay dance

Religion and culture

Kuala Lumpur is truly a cosmopolitan city catering to many religious groups. Islam is the most dominant religion with the strongest government support. For example, while travelling by train overnight in a berth, my girlfriend and I were not allowed to sleep together because we were not married. Muslim is the primary religion of the Malays and the Indian communities while other religions stemming from the Chinese population include Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. Hinduism is also practised by some Indians and there is a smattering of Christianity. Being a significantly important cross-road for thousands of years, Malaysia and Kuala Lumpur have a great mixture of many cultures; a mixture of indigenous Malay, the Chinese, Indians, Eurasians, as well as the Arabian cultures of Kadazan and Iban plus the other indigenous races who came from East Malaysia. Regarding country of origin, you will find peoples from Indonesia, Nepal, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Viet Nam, and Bangladesh.

Economy

With a strong state devoted to unfettered capitalism, Malaysia saw consistent growth from the 1970s which temporarily came to a stand-still during 1997 Asian currency crisis. The New Development Policy
Shopping in KL
Shopping in KL
unveiled in 1991 became Malaysia's economic blueprint for the next twenty years. About half of the total output comes from manufacturing such things like electronics, durable transport equipment, steel, machinery and textiles. Malaysia's natural resources include large reserves of oil and natural gas, tin, bauxite, copper, iron and even gold. Malaysia is the world's leader in palm oil. Timber, once strong, has been losing importance as conservation measures were introduced in the mid-1990s. Rubber, cocoa and pepper are other important cash crops. Tourism basically dominates the service sector, especially since the financial crisis of 1997.

Malaysia's three largest trading partners are Japan, the USA and Singapore. It is a member of the Pacific Rim organization APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Forum), assuming an ever important role in the regional economy. Only eighteeen months after the 1997 economic crisis, Malaysia returned to an amazing 9% growth rate, but this has declined to just over 3% lately.

At the time this article was written, November 11th, 2007, one US dollar was worth 3.32 Malaysia ringgits.

Visiting Kuala Lumpur

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for Americans: US citizens must have a valid passport. No visas are required for a stay of up to three months.

Entry requirements for UK nationals: UK nationals
Kuala Lumpur International Airport
Kuala Lumpur International Airport
require a passport, but do not require a visa, irrespective of the endorsement in the passport with regard to national status, providing the stay does not exceed three months and is for touristic purposes.

Entry requirements for Canadians: Canadians must have a valid passport. No visa is required for a stay of up to two months (an extension of one month is available). Entry requirements for Australians: Australians must have a valid passport. No visa is required for a stay of up to three months. Entry requirements for South Africans: South Africans must have a valid passport, but do not require a visa for a stay of up to three months. Entry requirements for New Zealanders: New Zealand nationals must hold a valid passport, but no visa is necessary for a stay of up to three months. Entry requirements for Irish nationals: Irish nationals require a valid passport, but no visa is necessary for a stay of up to three months. Passport/Visa Note: Passports must be valid for at least six months beyond the date of entry. All travellers require a return or onward ticket, and sufficient funds (at least US$500). Entry will be refused to those of a 'hippy' appearance and foreign women who are six months pregnant or more. Dual nationality is not recognised in Malaysia and those found holding two passports of different nationalities may be refused entry; it is advisable to enter Malaysia on the passport on which you exited your last country of departure.

Getting around Kuala Lumpur

There is a large efficient network of buses, taxis and light commuter trains to help you navigate the city, however, traffic jams are legendary, making the trains the best choice if the route is convenient, and during rush hour.
KL taxis
KL taxis

Taxis

Taxi cabs are white and red, and can be found almost anywhere in KL. There are two basic sizes. Though taxis drivers in the small taxis are obliged by law to use their meter, few care. The larger taxis seem to abide by the rule. As a tourist, you should insist on the meter being used, and if the cabbie tries to rip you off, you can report him to the police by jotting down personal details embossed boldly on the left part of his dashboard.

Buses

Arriving by bus to KL
Arriving by bus to KL

Buses are obviously the cheapest way of travel about the city. Bus stops are everywhere, and buses can take you anywhere, even out of the city. Remember, they are quite popular during rush hours, and can be extremely crowded. If you are claustrophobic, forget these times.

The government-controlled company, Rapid KL, runs the lion's share of city buses. They are red and white striped, and you get your ticket after depositing coins into a slot. There are also monthly passes. Private buses use a conductor who walks around the bus picking up your fare.

Rental cars

If you prefer convenience and freedom, renting a car is a great option. You can pay a deposit, then they charge you for mileage consumed. There are car rental agencies all over the city and at the airport, with a wide selection of car and 4WD types to choose from. Be aware that the locals drive like idiots, and therefore be ready all the time, expecting the unexpected.

Trains

KL rail services
KL rail services

Trains have become a major player in KL's transportation network, transporting passengers throught the city in a very efficient manner. The KTM Komuter train runs though the major areas of Kuala Lumpur. On the other hand the Monorail, Star, and Putra LRT are light rail systems on elevated tracks hovering above the busy city streets and intersections. The Putra LRT is actually about half subterranian. KL Sentral is Malaysia’s central railway hub located in Brickfields.

KTM system

The Keretapi Tanah Melayu (KTM) system is a typical railway train that operates on normal railway tracks. Used predominantly to service the large residential areas in the outskirts of the city, KTM has a long history in the development of Malaysia’s railway systems. The KTM railways connect from these outskirt areas to major parts of the city. There are two main tracks, one lies from Seremban to Rawang while the other is from Klang Port to Sentul.
KL monorail station
KL monorail station

The Monorail

The Monorail is the latest light rail transit system to be incorporated in Kuala Lumpur. The entire route is only about 9 km. long and the trains are considerably shorter and smaller, consisting of only two cars each. It also rides on thin, dual elevated beams rather than tracks. Its purpose is to serve the busiest routes in the 'Golden Triangle' and provide quick and efficient transport between adjacent commercial areas. The Monorail uses the same ticketing system as STAR and PUTRA. The Monorail starts from Pekeliling and ends at KL Sentral.

Sistem Aliran Transit Ringan (STAR)

Sistem Aliran Transit Ringan
Sistem Aliran Transit Ringan
As an elevated train starting from Sentul, the STAR light rail transit system begins in northern KL and heads south to Pudu and Masjid Jamek where the lines split into two, one going east to Ampang, the other continues further south to Sukan Negara. It is a thrill as your train moves over intersections and heavily vegetated areas. Six to ten trains leave per hour all day long until 11:30 pm. You
Putra train pulling into station
Putra train pulling into station
can buy tickets from the machines or even counters located in the stations then swipe your card into the machine in order to enter a waiting area.

Putra LRT

There is a new elevated monorail sixteen kilometers in length called the PRT running south from Jalan Tun Razak to the southwest outskirts of KL at Kampung Pasir. You'll see the 'Golden Triangle' along the way. All of the systems are interconnected throughout KL so you'll likely be experiencing more than one type of vehicle each trip.

Attractions in and around Kuala Lumpur

Merdeka Square

Merdeka Square
Merdeka Square
Marking the place where Malaysia attained independence in 1957, the tallest flagpole in the world rises 100 meters above Merdeka Square. You can see the colonial past in the architecture of the surrounding buildings, and the field has occasional cricket maches. On one corner of the square is the Royal Selangor Club in tudor-style, overlooking a large video screen with advertising and religious things. Once the club was strictly for whites, but now accepts anyone who can afford its membership. It served as a social centre for Kuala Lumpur’s British residents. Women are still not allowed into the bar except when invited.
KL Chinatown
KL Chinatown

Chinatown

This is a wonderful sensual experience, often crowded as you walk through the maze of shops, hearing ,seeing, touching, smelling and tasting. They close the central section of Petaling Street to traffic at night transforming it even more bright and exciting. Articles for sale such as jewelry, toys, and t-shirts are spread along the pavement for you to step around and over. Bargaining for lower prices is expected.

To get there, take the Putra LRT to Pasar Seni then it's a short walk to cross to Petaling Street.
Petronas Towers
Petronas Towers

Petronas Towers

Hard to miss in Kuala Lumpurs skyline, these twin towers are symbols of Mayaysia's economic emergence into the 21st century. Basically office space, they stand as the second highest buildings in the world at 452 meters above the ground, and have a 58 sky bridge joining them half way up. Islamic architecture combined with modern geometric technology inspired the result. Take the train or PUTRA light rail transit to Kuala Lumpur City Centre (KLCC). Admission is free, but tickets are limited. Get there at 8:30 am every day but
Kuala Lumpur Railway Station
Kuala Lumpur Railway Station
Monday and try your best.

Kuala Lumpur Railway Station

North Indian Islamic design inspired British architect, AB Hubbock when he drew the plans for this opulent railway station. Minarets, towers, spires and arches reach up against the skyscraper backdrop underlining the elegance of Moorish art. The train station is both aesthetic and functional for commuters. It is found at Jalan Hishamuddin.
Masjid Jamek
Masjid Jamek

Masjid Jamek or Friday Mosque

This mosque was built where the Gombak River meets the Klang River, a symbolic site dating back to the tin mining origins of KL. It has curving steps surrounded by palm trees leading down to the water's edge. Compared to the hustle and bustle of KL, it is a haven of tranquility and peace. Like mosques built by the mogals in northern India, minarets and cupolas rest atop the brick walls and arched colonades. Conservative dress and the removal of shoes is expected before entrance into the mosque. It is found at Jalan Tun Perak and the Masjid Jamek LRT station. Free admission and it is open Saturday to Thursday 8.30 am to 12.30 pm and 2.30 pm to 4 pm. On Friday it is open 8.30 am to 11 am and 2.30 pm to 4 pm.

KL's Lake Gardens
KL's Lake Gardens

Lake Gardens

These 60-hectare (148-acre) gardens established in 1888 form the green belt of Kuala Lumpur. The lush vegetation surrounds a vast lake. Visitors can take a leisurely boat cruise to enjoy views of the gardens from the water (RM4 per hour: Saturdays, 2pm to 5.30pm and Sundays 8am to 5.30pm). The gardens incorporate the National Monument, Butterfly House, Bird Park, Orchid and Hibiscus gardens, with Malaysia’s Parliament House situated at the northern end.

It is found at Jalan Perdana. Within the park, the Butterfly House is open daily 9am to 6pm; the Bird Park, the world's largest covered aviary with 3000 birds is open daily 9am to 6.30pm and the Orchid and Hibiscus Gardens are open daily 9am to 6pm. Admission fees are nominal.

Masjid Negara
Masjid Negara

Masjid Negara or National Mosque

Contrasting the Friday Mosque, the modern National Mosque, completed in 1965 is the largest mosque in SE Asia. The main prayer hall can fit up to 10,000 people. Many Malay office workers meet here on Friday afternoons for prayer. The eighteen point dome represents the thirteen states of Malaysia plus the five Pillars of Islam. Entry for non-Muslims is permitted once prayers have finished. You can borrow robes at the mosque entrance. It is found at Jalan Sultan Hishamuddin and the Pasar Seni LRT station; Open daily from 9am to 6pm, and Friday from 2.45pm to 6pm.

Muzium Negara
Muzium Negara

Muzium Negara or National Museumm

Preserved artefacts from Malaysia's past and cultural items are spread throughout this Minangkabau architectural style building. There are ethnographic and archaeological displays including life-size scenes showing various traditions of Malaysian life. Wayang kilt or shadow play depict the ancient artistry of the nation, and exhibits of early weapons such as kris (daggers) and parangs (machetes) show Malaysian pride in their functional yet aesthetic shapes. The museum is found at Jalan Damansara, bus to Jalan Travers; Open daily from 9 am to 6 pm, nominal admission.

Batu Caves
Batu Caves

Batu Caves

These caves are located 13km north of KL. They remain a sacred place for Malaysia's Hindus. Batu Caves are temples where they hold the very significant festival 'Thaipusam'. The caves were opened up in 1892 and are 400 meters long by 120 meters high.

Taman Negara National Park
Taman Negara National Park

Taman Negara National Park

This giant protected park spanning thousands of square kilometers has some of the most ancient rainforest on the planet, whose rich and diverse flora and fauna evolved over the last 130 million years. Trekking along its many paths is the best way to see it. You may be lucky to catch a glimpse of the remote and nomadic living Orang Asli people asd their makeshift shelters within the dense jungle. There is fishing, river rafting and bird watching. Climbers can even explore the Malay Peninsula’s highest mountain, Gunung Tahan at over two kilometers above sea level. The dryer March and September period is the best time to see the park.

Shopping in KL

Visitors can enjoy a variety of shopping ranging from traditional and souvenirs to modern goods. There are several modern shopping complexes and expansive malls jostling to bring their international brand name products to your attention. There is no need to wait for Singapore, KL has it all at similar prices.

Plus there are open-air markets and shops around every corner with traditional hand-made goods. Being the capital and dominating the country of Malaysia, you need not venture into the countryside to find anything, from practical applications to wall decorations and memorabilia.

Brass, pewter and silver gift ideas include jewellery, figurines, key-chains, and pen-holders, all having been crafted by indigenous metal-smiths with the precision to create both artistic and practical objects.

Pottery and wood carvings imported from other Malaysian states can be used practically like jars and mugs, while others such as huge spoons and statues crafted in ebony with intricate designs make nice ornaments.

Traditional fabrics are another favourite choice among visitors. Malay garments such as Kain Songket – distinct Malay brocade made of silk with gold and silver threads woven in as well as Batik, an art form developed in Indonesia using wax and dyes.

Twice a year the government sponsors month long shopping carnivals catering to buying enthusiasts from around the globe. From amazing electronics to designer brand cloths, you will be spoiled with the selection.

Internationally recognized fumes, fashion accessories and the planet's newest electronic marvels are found on everyone's shopping list, sold in department stores and shopping malls.

KL Cuisine

OK, after all is said and done, if you are on a limited budget or schedule, skip the sight seeing and the shopping, but don't miss the food. Malaysians love to eat, and do it all the time!

Where

Probably the neatest place to begin is Jalan Alor. Formerly the infamous red light district, it has undergone a number of transformations and now caters to another part of the body, your stomach! Food stalls are
Jalan Alor food stalls
Jalan Alor food stalls
parked rather haphazardly along the street. The variety of dishes may be a bit overwhelming for first timers, so take a local, and try what he suggests. It is open from about 6pm into the early morning. Uptown Damansara is a more municipalized version of Jalan Alor as the concrete stalls are assigned a number. The place lacks the free wheelinmg charm of Jalan Alor, but there are plenty of sumptious choices to tempt your senses. Malay, Chinese, Indian, and a fusion, they have it all. Tony's fried Kueh Teow is one of the favourites. It is open all day for all three meals.
Petaling Street
Petaling Street

Petaling Street specializes in Chinese food. Tourists should start with the menu. The pictures on the menu will give you a good indication of what your meal will look like, however flavour and spicyness vary. Most have a good beer selection as well. With the constant long line ups, Hokkien Noodles on the corner of Hong Leong Bank is quite popular and worth the wait.

Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman at the Coliseum - it is like the British people never evacuated Kuala Lumpur. Dark, damp and smokey, with white tableclothes yellowed over time. Even some of the waiters seem as old as the nearby hills, but perfect! A great ambience to soak up while enjoying your steak with fresh mushrooms. The bar is a great place to meet other like minded people and start on the gossip mill. Or hang out at the bar, and get yourself informed on the latest gossip in town, there is never a shortage of local characters!

Oh, the food!
Oh, the food!

Oh, the food!

Wherever you go, enjoy dishes such as grilled chicken wings, wanton noodles, pork ball noodles, prawn noodle soup, pan mee, beef ball noodles, Hailam noodles, Hainanese chicken rice, fish ball noodle soup, Cantonese fried noodles, ginger kway teow dish, roasted duck rice, fish head noodle soup, laksa lemak, and yong tow foo just to name a few. Be daring, everyone order something different and share, you'll all love the experience!

Safety issues

Malaysia is relatively prosperous compared to its neighbours, and with a more highly educated population, crime is lessened. Generally Kuala Lumpur is a safe city, and violent crime is virtually unheard of. There really aren't any terrible areas to be concerned. This being said, if you leave yourself vulnerable, pick pockets and drive-by motorcycle purse snathings can occur.

When travelling through Malaysia on an overnight train with berths, my fiance was not alowed to sleep with me, and we drove the conductor crazy. Sex tourism is not a major issue in Malaysia, and therefore, it seems to cater to more wholesome tourism, such as families.

Unfortunately their education has not passed over to traffic safety and courtesy. Many drive insanely, and if you are able, use public tarnsportation and taxis. Pedestrians are given no right of way, and take their lives into their hands when crossing the road.

Fortunately for us, because of British colonialism, most people speak English. They have policemen specifically employed as tourist police, with their checkered hat bands.

Health concerns

You should be pleased to know health standards, infrastructure and services in Mayaysia are respectable, and the lion's share of services are in the Kuala Lumpur area. The majority of doctors have been trained in the First World and generally speak English. As a tourist, it is 'pay as you play', and often you find you will be asked to pay by cash or credit card in advance.

The city has banned open-burning, leaded gasoline and smoking within enclosed public places, so what was once a problem for your lungs now seems under control. However, mindless slash and burn agriculture practices in nearby Indonesia during the drier August and September season has caused a haze over Malaysia resulting in air traffic control difficulties.

Both Dengue fever and malaria, caused by mosquitos is coming under control as a government campaign to educate people about the harm of keeping still water around seems to be working. Still, especially at night, it is advisable to use bug spray, long clothes, and sleep under mosquito nets. Anti-malaria pills may be helpful, but there are health drawbacks to taking these, so it is a saw-off.

If you aren't planning to stay in rural areas too long, you have a very small chance of getting pneumonia and influenza, hepatitis A and B, typhoid, polio, malaria, tuberculosis, Japanese encephalitis, tetanus and rabies.

Doctors, by law, are required to report cases of AIDS. It is said that sexually transmitted diseases are low among Kuala Lumpur's sex industry, there is a greater danger with unprotected casual sex.

Healthy inspectors keep a eye on all food outlets, including the street vendors. Be prepared for hot and spicey selections, which most people can handle. There are also restaurants specializing in 'tamer' Western dishes. Avoid drinking tap water, even made into ice cubes. The better restaurants and hotels serve only bottles water.

This website link could save your life

If you are new to travelling, or even if you have travelled the globe for years, I strongly recommend you check out the following link for some very interesting and informative reading about safe travelling in Delhi, and the Third World in general. It is an accumulation of original thoughts and experiences of several worldly travellers, just go to safe travel. It was written with the Third World in mind, where travelling disasters are around every corner, and a pre-emptor to what we may all expect someday in the First World as populations increase and desperate people become more brave and sophisticated in their survival techniques. It will make you aware of all sorts of scams, how to check into a hotel, advice for single lady travellers, advice for single men travellers, rip tides, credit card scams, driving in a foreign land, kidnapping, street people, you name it. It is an essential read for anyone travelling, and the most comprehensive discussion I know of!